Become An Adult Leader

BECOMING A VOLUNTEER 

USNSCC OFFICER CORPS

NLCC Graduation with Volunteer

The NSCC Officer Corps is made of dedicated volunteers adult leaders, both civilian and military, who provide for the administration of all facets of the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps. This includes the operation of local units to the operation of two-week summer training programs. Officers must be U.S. Citizens and be at least 21 years of age.

NSCC MIDSHIPMAN

NSCC midshipmen are adult leaders in training who are between the ages of 18 and 21. Normally NSCC midshipmen are former cadets who reached the rate of seaman as a cadet, former JROTC cadets, or members of the military who are not old enough to be an NSCC instructor or officer.

NSCC INSTRUCTOR

An NSCC instructor is an adult leader who either has an interest in becoming an NSCC officer or who wants to dedicate his or her time to mentoring and training cadets. All persons applying to be in the NSCC Officer Corps are first enrolled as an NSCC instructor for a period of one year. After one year, instructors may apply for an appointment to the NSCC Officer Corps or remain an instructor. Instructor responsibilities are generally less than those of an officer.

CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK

To ensure the safety and security of cadets, all NSCC adult leaders undergo a background check at initial enrollment and periodically at the discretion of NSCC National Headquarters.

I AM A PARENT OF A CADET. CAN I BE AN NSCC ADULT LEADER?

Yes. In fact a large percentage of NSCC adult leader are parents of current and former cadets. Involved parents are the lifeblood of the NSCC Officer Corps.

REQUIRED EXPERIENCE

The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps is organized along military lines; therefore, having military experience is a definite plus, but it is not a requirement. Experienced adult leaders and senior cadets will gladly help you become familiar with the military atmosphere. At most local units, volunteers are needed to instruct cadets in a variety of subjects, keep and maintain service records, keep track of cadet training, maintain unit supply, and recruit and publicize the program. As long as you are motivated and willing to help in the cause of promoting the positive development of youth, there is a place for you in the Corps.

Winter Training Volunteers

DO I GET TO WEAR A UNIFORM?

Yes. NSCC officers, midshipman, and instructors are authorized by the Secretary of the Navy to wear the U.S. Navy officer uniforms appropriately modified with NSCC insignia.

WILL I HAVE TO PURCHASE MY OWN UNIFORM?

In most cases, yes. NSCC adult leaders are authorized to purchase uniform items from U.S. Navy Uniform Shops on base and the Navy’s Uniform Support Center in Pensacola, FL by phone and mail order. In some cases units have a supply of surplus/used uniforms that may be provided at no or nominal cost. Many large Naval bases also have Navy and Marine Corps Relief Society thrift shops that sell used uniform items at deep discounts. In any case uniform purchases are often income tax-deductible (consult your tax attorney for more information).

DO I HAVE TO BE PHYSICALLY FIT?

Yes. You must be physically fit and free from ailments that would prevent you from supervising youth and performing your assigned duties. You must also meet U.S. Navy weight standards to wear the NSCC uniform.  Those who do not meet the weight requirements may wear an alternate civilian style uniform.

ADULT LEADERS EARN RANK

Those adult leaders who apply for appointment to the NSCC Officer Corps will have the opportunity to earn rank. New NSCC officers are appointed by the NSCC Executive Director to the rank of ensign. The NSCC officer rank structure parallels that of the U.S. Navy. NSCC officers may promote through the rank of lieutenant commander. In order for NSCC officers to promote they must meet minimum performance, training, and time-in-service requirements. They must also contribute a minimum amount of volunteer service to NSCC summer training programs. NSCC officer rank is entirely honorary and does not have any relation to or authority and entitlements of actual military rank.

I CAN ONLY COMMIT A COUPLE OF HOURS A MONTH. CAN I STILL HELP?

Absolutely! We understand that there are many people who want to help but have busy lives, and giving up 20-30 hours a month to be a full time volunteer is just not feasible. Often all it takes is a couple of hours a month to help a unit sort uniforms, teach a class, chaperone a field trip and the like. The contribution of a few dedicated part-time volunteers can go a long way to accomplish the overall mission.

READY TO START YOUR ADVENTURE?

ADULT LEADER APPLICATION